New Cosmos Series

Books are the physical embodiment of knowledge and enlightenment, the teller of stories, the keeper of secrets, and ultimately the record of our history.  These sculptural icons are our interpretation of this important cultural symbol.

Our little copper books are fun to make and delightful to many patrons.  Each book is a 12″square of wood, clad with copper and then hand-hammered or embossed with texture.  On each we make little books with copper pages that are bound together with silver wire and have a colorful backing.   The pages are hammered on the edges and then usually embossed with an elusive script to add mystery.  In the case of our newest ones, the pages are embossed with readable messages.  The first new set is a Cosmos Series and shown here is the first.Other little books that go with this one say Moon, Star, Sun, Venus, Comets.

 



New Bentwoods

Robin and I are continuing our progression of the bentwoods, only now the surfaces are partially or completely clad with copper.  The contrast of the metal surface with the painted crackled wood surface is very pleasing.  This set also includes stainless steel chain, enamel on copper and hammered brass square rods with chemical patina

 

Bentwood Sculpture

Many years ago, I began making bentwood frames for sculpture.  The process involves making a framework over which a specialty laminated wood can be bent over the frame, clamped together and left overnight for the glue to cure.  Shown here are a couple of the bentwood sculptures I did in the past.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More recently we’ve made some bentwood sculptures like these:  

 

Robin’s New Work & My Retreat

The Other Side

After a 6 year hiatus, Robin will be showing his incredible patinated metal art next year!  We’ve been collaborating since 2012, a decision that was made after breaking my elbow, having shoulder surgery, a torn bicep tendon and 2 dislocated fingers.  I couldn’t help Robin hang his work at the shows, because at that time, all of his work was very heavy, being made from a heavy gauge copper or brass with bronze angle framework on the back.  During the past 6 years he’s learned more skills and come up with ideas for making his work much lighter weight.  Some of the metal will be clad onto bentwood frames to give added dimension and all will feature his extraordinary patina work that is very painterly in approach and feel.  I’m so excited for him.  During the eight years he showed his work he did it all—got into the nations’ top shows, sold well and won many prestigious awards, including Best of Metal at the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s Fine Craft Show.

I will be taking a much-needed retreat from the art shows.  I’m getting burnt out from the relentless pushing of a theme for the past 25 years.  Not many people outside the profession understand the hoops an artist must jump through just to get into the shows.  The part that is holding me back just now is that it can be a whole year or more from the time you finish a piece, photograph it, apply to shows with 5 or 6 other pieces that all visually make sense together and then actually do the show.  This makes it very difficult to explore different avenues, as the work you have in your booth must be like the images you juried in with.

I’ve got a persistent urge to work in clay, probably stemming from my pre-school years spent making mud pies!  Several years ago I did a series of clay torsos which was a very emotional response to my family situation.  Having moved on past that, the clay work I’ve done the past couple of years making flowers for our wooden boats, isn’t enough for me.  So while Robin shows his metalwork next year, I’ll be on a self-proclaimed sabbatical, exploring new themes.  I will accept commission work during this time, for anyone that wants a boat or Jewelry for the Wall sculpture.

Loyal Patrons

With the sad news of the flooding in Houston, I’m reminded of the wonderful Texas patrons we have.  Though we’ve never done a show in Houston, we’ve done several shows in Austin and the Dallas-Fort Worth area several times with my work, Robin’s and our collaborative work.  Some of my most loyal patrons are from Austin, Richardson and the Fort Worth area.

Just this spring at the Northern VA Fine Art Festival in Reston, a couple  walked into our booth and with a surprised look on their faces, inquired if we’d done the Fort Worth Art Fair 15 years ago.  They recognized my surfaces, and coincidentally we have now returned to the boat shape, something we worked on many years ago.  They told us how much they’ve enjoyed the sculpture they purchased then and informed us of their “canoes” voyage from Texas to St. Louis, Mo and then on to Reston, VA.

 

Ark installationThis is the sculpture they purchased in Texas, and much to our joy, they purchased a little gondola with calla lilies and a copper base on that spring day this year in Reston.Gondola w callas

New Work for Phil Museum Show

“Serenity” is finished and she turned out beautifully.  She’s one of our new cargo vessels.  The Cargo Vessel Series carry something symbolic on their deck–a gift, a boon a treasure in the form of a nest or flowers.  “Serenity” has a recessed deck carved to simulate gentle ripples on the surface of the water.  She has hand-painted clay flowers on a hull of carved basswood with a crackled and painted finish.  The open flower has silver wire stamens and the boat rests on a walnut base.

While the symbolism of the water-lily varies from one culture to another, it is interesting to note that the scientific name for them is Nymphaea, from the Greek word for nymph referring to the feminine spirit inhabiting bodies of water.  In this sculpture I’ve chosen the water-lily to represent the importance of nature on our journey.  For me personally, it is also representative of my teenage daughter, the would-be marine biologist, whose life was lost in the water, during the bloom of the water-lilies.

detail-serenity

serenity-detail

 

 

 

 

 

We are also showing the first two sculptures from a concept by Robin, called “The Life Boat Series”.  These boats will all have a box, sometimes hidden in the hull and others carrying it on the deck.  The box is for the interment of a loved one’s ashes or mementos of a life.  Shown here is “Reflections” which carries a hand-hammered and patinaed copper box with a clay scarab, symbol of eternity.  This box may hold a portion of one’s ashes or wedding rings or other mementos.  reflections

 

 

 

 

“Voyager” has a hammered copper clad deck and a large hidden box within the hull.  Resting on the lid, is a copper nest, home to a single golden rose, symbol of love.  voyager voyager-detailThese sculptures and more will be exhibited in our booth Nov 10-13 at the Phil Convention Center, in the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s Fine Craft Show.

“Serenity”

The water-lily boat already has a name–“Serenity”.  Robin snapped this photo as I’m refining the arrangement pattern for the 3 flowers and 2 proposed lilypads.  The flowers are unfired–the clay I use is gray while wet and fires to a snow-white.  Since this photo was taken the hull of the boat has been  crackled and awaits the painting process after several days curing and 2 lilypads, shown here are cardboard patterns I’ve made,  have been sculpted in clay also.

serenity-arrangement